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Disability friendly holidays

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Use the directory to search for disability friendly holidays.

You can also read advice and guidance about disability friendly holidays below:

Travelling with an autistic child

Travelling with an autistic child can present difficulties. Even children with mild symptoms can experience acute feelings of anxiety when dealing with strange places and situations. 

Doing the below things can help:

  • Planning the trip from start to finish is recommended. Finding autism friendly venues, finding out what facilities are provided and whether the staff can understand autism spectrum disorder 
  • By talking to your child about the trip to help them understand. Preparing them as much as possible is encouraged to help with any anxiety
  • If your child relies on routine then it could be helpful to create a detailed timetable describing what activities you will be doing every day
  • If travelling by aeroplane you can contact the airline directly and explain to them that your child has autism spectrum disorder. This will help the airline staff to support your family
  • Encourage other children or family members to join in with activities with your autistic child. It's also a good idea for them to play games together that they can later play whilst travelling

Travelling with a disabled child

As with any trip or holiday it is important to do some research beforehand with:

  • Travel agents - enquire what sort of assistance they offer and provide them with as much information as possible in advance
  • Airline - under European law, people with disabilities or with reduced mobility have legal rights to assistance when travelling by air. It’s important to let airlines know your needs at least 48 hours before you travel
  • Ferry - with most ferry companies you need to tell them the level of assistance you will require for your travel when you make your booking
  • Train - you can give National Rail train companies advance notice if you think you’ll need any help from staff. You can also check the National Rail website to check a station has accessible facilities

There are a couple of things to consider when taking medication with you on holiday.

  • Enough supply for the duration of stay, and an extra supply in case of delays or emergencies.
  • A confirmation letter from your GP to say that you need the medication and keep a list in case you lose it. (Some airlines will demand this on certain medications)
  • Store them in the original packaging so that security agents(at the airport) or in case of an emergency the service team can know what they are.
  • In case your trip involves flying, then remember that the airline is entitled to inspect your medication so you should pack them in the hand luggage where possible. 

If your child takes medication there may be some legal requirements if you are travelling abroad. Some countries will not accept certain drugs unless you have a licence. 

Full details about taking medication abroad are available on the UK Government website.

It is essential before going on holiday to ensure that you have an adequate holiday insurance cover.

You should make sure that it is relevant to you, and that the policy terms should not include any exclusion clauses that may affect you.

It is a good idea to include all family members who will be travelling together in the one policy. This will avoid the hassle of having to deal with two or more companies in the event of a claim involving all of you. Often, an insurer will offer a lower 'family rate' for such a policy.

Disclaimer

The inclusion of any company / society / group / person’s within the directory should not be used as a recommendation of that company / society / group / person’s name products and / or services.

We'd advise that before you use any service not provided by Wokingham Borough Council listed you follow the advice on  checks to make before using services.

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