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Preparing for adulthood: Education

Becoming an adult: Education

We'll make sure that all young people and their parents or carers get the information, advice and support they need when moving from school into: 

  • Further education
  • Training
  • Employment
  • Adult Social Care Services

If you have an  Education Health and Care Plan it will be reviewed at least once a year. From the age of 14 these reviews should focus more on moving onto college, training or finding a job. You can request support from the Special Educational Needs and Disability Information Advice and Support Service (SENDIASS)

Find out more on the  reviewing Education, Health and Care Plans page.

Search the services directory to find education and training options once you're 16.

 If you decide you're not going to stay in education then your Education Health and Care Plan will stop when you leave.

Other support you get will carry on if agreed. For example this could be from social care or health services. They will have their own arrangements to provide:

  • A plan setting out what you want to achieve
  • The support needed to meet achieve what you want
  • How this will be provided

Finding a job, traineeship or apprenticeship

Go to the becoming an adult: jobs and careers page.

If you are looking at higher education options, you will need to consider:

  • What and where to study
  • Entry requirements
  • Costs of going to university
  • Financial support available
  • Disability support including care arrangements


You can access career advice and guidance through your school or college to help you with your choices. The National Careers website also gives additional information and support to help you make decisions on your learning.

Your annual reviews starting from year 9 will include discussions about your future options, which should cover: 

  • Housing needs
  • Education and employment
  • Social needs
  • Care needs

For further information read our reviewing Education, Health and Care Plans webpage.

Your Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan will end when you start higher education as the funding for your support will come from the Disabled Students Allowance.

If you would like a copy of your EHC plan to be passed onto the college or university you are planning to attend please let the Special Educational Needs team know. You can also take a copy of your EHC plan with you to your university interview or visit and discuss your support needs with the disability adviser.

A university will develop a Learning Support Plan (LSP) or Individual Learning Plan (ILP) to identify your individual needs which should be based on your EHC plan. Universities are increasingly making sure that learning is accessible to all students.

The Disability Rights UK website has a useful guide into higher education, you can also access advice through their disabled students helpline.

Universities and colleges provide a wide range of services for students that are separate from the teaching arrangements. These include money advice, accommodation, counselling, health and wellbeing centres, careers and employment advice and disabled student services.

Financial support

If you're a student and you have a disability or long term health condition you can apply for Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) on the  UK Government website

The amount you can get depends on your individual needs and the type of course you're doing.

You can find out more about Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) by watching this short film:

Other financial help is also available for students: 


Personal care and support

The Disabled Student Allowance only covers the cost of your study. You may also need assistance and practical help for everyday living. You need to ask adult social care for a needs assessment you can request this any time before your 18 birthday. If you already have a social worker speak to them about getting an assessment.

Find out more on the arranging a needs assessment webpage.

If you are eligible for support you will be offered a personal budget. Read our personal budget explained webpage for more information.

Check with your university to see if there are any local volunteering schemes to help you to settle into university life or go to the volunteering matters website.

Further information 

As young people develop, and increasingly form their own views, they should be
involved more and more closely in decisions about their own future.

Visit our when can a young person make their own decisions web page to find out more.

To find more support services search the children and young people with additional needs directory.

Useful websites and resources which go into more details about preparing for adulthood:

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